Watch the collection Hypatia

Hypatia ( born c. 350–370; died 415) was the first woman to make a substantial contribution to the development of mathematics. She was, in her time, the world’s leading mathematician and astronomer, the only woman for whom such claim can be made. She was a prominent thinker of the Neoplatonic school in Alexandria where she taught philosophy and astronomy. Hypatia was renowned in her own lifetime as a great teacher and a wise counselor. She is known to have written a commentary on Diophantus’s thirteen-volume Arithmetica, which may survive in part, having been interpolated into Diophantus’s original text, and another commentary on Apollonius of Perga’s treatise on conic sections, which has not survived. Many modern scholars also believe that Hypatia may have edited the surviving text of Ptolemy’s Almagest, based on the title of her father Theon’s commentary on Book III of the Almagest. Biography Hypatia

Watch the collection Amelia Earhart


Amelia Mary Earhart ( born July 24, 1897 – disappeared July 2, 1937, declared dead January 5, 1939) was an American aviation pioneer and author. Earhart was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She set many other records,[3] wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences, and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. Born in Atchison, Kansas, Earhart developed a passion for adventure at a young age, steadily gaining flying experience from her twenties. In 1928, Earhart became the first female passenger to cross the Atlantic by airplane (accompanying pilot Wilmer Stultz), for which she achieved celebrity status. During an attempt to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe in 1937 in a Purdue-funded Lockheed Model 10-E Electra, Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island. Biography Amelia Earhart

Watch the collection Zaha Hadid



Dame Zaha Mohammad Hadid DBE RA (Arabic: زها حديد‎ Zahā Ḥadīd; 31 October 1950 – 31 March 2016) was a British Iraqi architect from Baghdad, Iraq. She was described by The Guardian of London as the “Queen of the curve”, who “liberated architectural geometry, giving it a whole new expressive identity”. Zaha Hadid’s pioneering vision redefined architecture for the 21st century and captured imaginations across the globe. Her major works include the London Aquatics Centre for the 2012 Olympics, the Broad Art Museum in the US, the MAXXI Museum in Rome, and the Guangzhou Opera House in China. Hadid was the first woman to receive the Pritzker Architecture Prize, in 2004. She received the UK’s most prestigious architectural award, the Stirling Prize, in 2010 and 2011. In 2012, she was made a Dame by Elizabeth II for services to architecture, and in February, 2016, the month preceding her death, she became the first and only woman to be awarded the Royal Gold Medal from the Royal Institute of British Architects. Biography Zaha Hadid


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